NYT: “The Making of a U.K. Millennial Socialist”

Stand with our British sisters, brothers, and comrades!!!

nyti.ms/2GEXexS

Countering the Right: Right-Wing Scare Tactics on Seattle Minimum Wage Increase

Every once in a while a news headline on Yahoo’s home page catches my eye, mostly because it seems completely ridiculous.  Yesterday was no exception when I saw the ominous headline “Restaurants in Seattle Going Dark as $15 an Hour Minimum Wage Looms“.  A scary headline for an article with content that shouldn’t scare anyone that made it past kindergarten.

When it comes to right-wing scare tactics on minimum wage increases in general, one is forced to accept a fallacy that would crush their argument if they ever had to address it.  The fallacy is this: people making minimum wage would not spend the extra money they would make from a wage increase.  In other words, the money would simply be paid to them and then find its way into a black hole, never to be heard from again.  There would be no increase in consumer spending on basic products or other goods and services and no increase in the sales and production of residual businesses not paying their workers minimum wage.  The article linked is no exception as it feeds the reader the fallacy and makes no mention of the reality of minimum wage increases. 

Another right-wing tactic is to always focus on restaurants and how they will fail if the minimum wage is ever increased.  This is nothing more than using a convenient target to try to sway the uninformed.  Depending on what statistics you use, the failure rate of restaurants in the first three years is generally accepted at roughly 60%.  In other words, most restaurants will fail regardless of the minimum wage so its an easy but deceiving target for the right to use when arguing their absurd points.

While this is no surprise, there is another snippet of info given in the piece that deserves further analysis.  The article gives us some numbers that seem scary on the surface when read:

Washington Restaurant Association’s Anthony Anton puts it this way: “It’s not a political problem; it’s a math problem.”

“He estimates that a common budget breakdown among sustaining Seattle restaurants so far has been the following: 36 percent of funds are devoted to labor, 30 percent to food costs and 30 percent go to everything else (all other operational costs). The remaining 4 percent has been the profit margin, and as a result, in a $700,000 restaurant, he estimates that the average restauranteur in Seattle has been making $28,000 a year.

Gasp!  The owner only making $28k a year on a $700k a year restaurant?  Sounds horrific…unless we choose to do some math.  Let’s play this game.

$700k divided by 365 days gives us an average daily revenue of $1918.  Let’s assume the restaurant is open on average 12 hours a day (10 am-10 pm, for example, lunch and dinner).  $1918 divided by 12 gives us roughly $160 per hour.  Assuming the average customer spends $10 per meal and drink, we get 16 customers per hour.  If a restaurant in a major city like Seattle is only getting that many customers per hour, they are clearly on their way to closing their doors anyway.  But wait, there’s more.

As is noted, 36% of funds are devoted to labor.  36% of $700k is 252000.  A 36-hour per week worker (6 days, 6 hours per in this scenario) making Washington’s minimum wage ($9.47) makes $17,725 a year.  $252k divided by $17,725 gives us roughly 14 workers.  With a 12 hour day, you would need a minimum of two workers per position.  That gives us 2 hosts/hostesses (assuming you need it), 2 cooks, 2 kitchen preps, 2 dishwashers, 1 additional manager, and 5 servers (who apparently make the state minimum wage in Washington).  Here’s where an important reality comes to light in their numbers given.

With 5 servers, you would have 3 working half of the time to split the previously derived 16 customers per hour, which is completely ridiculous in terms of being grossly overstaffed.  Assuming the 16 customers are 8 couples dining together, this means a little less than 3 tables per hour per server.  As someone who was once an atrocious excuse for a server in my earlier working days and can speak from experience, a server can easily handle 6-7 tables per hour without breaking much of a sweat.  And that’s if you’re terrible at your job, like I was.

In other words, the restaurant in the example given is clearly overstaffed and badly run on top of not getting enough foot traffic in the first place.  If we were to bring the server situation down to a more appropriate level, what happens with the owner’s $28k a year takeaway on a $700k restaurant?  What if you take away 1 or both hosts/hostesses because they aren’t needed due to the light customer traffic?  If we take out 4 workers, we suddenly get an additional $70k.  Obviously, some of this would go to the additional manager and (hopefully) some raises, but the owner is likely taking a good chunk of this home.  What happens to that $28k per year?  Exactly.

If the right wants to scare the country into believing the minimum wage should not be increased or should go away entirely, they should probably use a better hypothetical example than a badly run, overstaffed restaurant with too little of a customer base to survive in such a big city.

5 Quick Political Facts for Today (2/19/15)

Lies and income inequality, oh my!

  • Israel is lying about the West’s negotiations with Iran.  Not exactly shocking but this sums it up nicely:

(U.S.) State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki confirmed that there was a “selective sharing” of information.

“I think it’s safe to say that not everything you’re hearing from the Israeli government is an accurate reflection of the details of the talks,” she said.

But, hey.  It’s Israel.  I’m sure they’ve never lied about anything in the past, particularly when they’ve claimed they needed to “mow the lawn” in Gaza.  And, honestly, does anyone think they care if they get caught in a lie?  It’s not like they’ve had to pay for any of the more vicious acts, like the despicable war crimes they’ve committed against the Palestinians.

  • Speaking of lying, a new report by the U.S. Army War College finds “‘dishonesty and deception’ among Army personnel is common, often encouraged to maintain a false sense of integrity.”  This isn’t overly shocking in terms of the psychological aspect but the word “encouraged” should be a little disheartening in the sense that this suggests it’s a top-down action.  The integrity part begins at the top and, if it isn’t being displayed by the highest ranks, it’s not surprising when those in the lower ranks take things like torture even farther than the rules state.  This is the reason why holding those at the top accountable for their despicable orders is so important.
  • Middle-class wages dipped again last year, but the story isn’t all bad.  If we push our elected officials to intervene with the right legislative actions, things can get better:

Still, wage trends last year underscore that policy makers can do a lot to boost workers’ pay. Take the rise in wages for the country’s lowest-paid workers, which the EPI says is proof that policy changes are positively impacting American families. Those states that raised their minimum wages last year — including New York, Florida and California — witnessed a pay gain of 1.6 percent for the lowest-paid workers, compared with a 0.3 percent increase for those without a rise in a state’s baseline pay.

Just another example of how the government can do things to reduce the dangerous levels of economic inequality in the U.S., something the voters want as pointed out next.

  • 60% or more Americans want higher minimum wages, paid sick leave, and requirements for time off after the birth of a child.  As inequality continues to get worse, these numbers will just continue to grow over time.  The question now becomes, how high will they have to get before change will come?  I’m sure Congress will consider all of these quickly since it’s filled with so many middle-class workers that have no sick time and will soon be having children…
  • Walmart will be hiking wages to $10 per hour a year from now.  Yes, you read that right.  Income inequality has gotten so out of control that one of its biggest villains is giving in to the pressure.  Soon, Walmart employees will be able to climb the economic ladder from desperate poverty to just regular poverty.  Walmart’s stock price took a hit today because of the announcement since doing even the slightest thing to help the 99% really angers the 1%.  Remember folks, capitalism is not about the wealthy exploiting the poor!*

*Statement approved and paid for by Exploiters of the 99% of America.

Just Like in 2012, Progressive Ideas Win Big on Election Day

Elizabeth_Warren_Nov_2_2012
Photo: Tim Pierce

After President Obama won reelection in 2012, I pointed out how progressive ideas did really well when put to the vote by the public on ballot measures.  While the Republican party is celebrating their non-surprising gains in the legislative branch, progressive ideas absolutely dominated on the ballot, even in red states.

Taking a look at the 13 initiatives highlighted by CNN, 12 have been decided as of this writing.  In only one case did the progressive side lose and even that was not a majority loss (58% approved medical marijuana in Florida, 60% was needed).  CNN’s list did not include other victories for progressive thought, such as the legalization of marijuana in D.C. or the lopsided defeat of the North Dakota anti-choice measure.  Whether it was marijuana, minimum wage laws, birth control or most other issues, the left won.

The fact is, progressive thought is winning and winning big everywhere in the country, even in the alleged “red states”.  But the Republican wins would suggest a different story.  How to explain this?

The reasons are many but I’m reminded here of something Bill Maher recently asked of Senator Elizabeth Warren: “Why aren’t there more people who talk like you in the Democratic Party?”

Again, there are a lot of factors at play here but there is little doubt Democrats have been (and many still are) terrible at pointing out what is a progressive position and what is a conservative one on so many issues.  And when they fail to do that it not only makes voters ignorant as to who stands where, it takes all the energy out of your base and they will only lackadaisically support you, at best.  Seriously, Democratic candidates.  If you are going to lose, at least have some guts to speak forcefully about what it is your ideology means to the everyday person.  Maybe then you won’t have to watch so many of your candidates lose while so much of your ideology wins.

Minimum Wage Is Just Unfair

kshama-sawant-seattle-minimum-wage-victoryI’ve been reading about the minimum-wage increase to $15.00-an-hour in Seattle lately and the most important point made on the issue that I have read is in an op-ed by Will Hutton in The Guardian.

The campaigners had two important replies to the charges that this would make Seattle’s fast food, catering and hotel industries uneconomic. The first was that living on the old minimum wage of $9.10 (£5.41) an hour was scarcely possible; families depended on food stamps, homes were dark and the cheapest of presents for kids was simply unaffordable. Compare that with the profits of the corporations and pay of the fast food bosses: the CEO of McDonald’s is paid more than $9m (£5.3m). Maybe they could be paid less and their workers a fraction more?

The problem with living in the United States in an economic sense is the financial disparity. If you read Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the 21st Century, the numbers are vertiginous (a term Piketty often uses.) The difference between the national income of the top decile (10%), not to mention the top centile (1%) of the population, and the rest of us is simply sickening.

The powers that be want us to think about whether if we believe a low-wage, working citizen deserves that $15.00 an hour. Do they work hard enough? Did they work hard enough in High School? Do they? Did they?

But let me turn that argument on it’s ear: does the CEO at McDonald’s actually earn $9 million dollars a year? What about the Wall Street CEO’s who make $150 million or $180 million in a year? Do they deserve that? Do they work hard enough? I’m sure they get a lot more vacation hours than the people at the bottom of the ladder, with better healthcare and all the perks they could desire.

It’s an issue of fairness and the minimum wage does not provide some of our hardest workers basic human dignity.

 

 

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The Working Poor and Raising Minimum Wage

Blow_New-thumbLarge-v2A powerful argument by Charles M. Blow in the NYT on why the minimum wage should be increased with the rising numbers of the working poor in the “Land of Opportunity.”

He argues that it is about dignity and not being in a state of constant worry over paying one’s bills. He also makes the good argument that the working poor cannot afford to donate to political campaigns and can only reach the voting boot on election day with great effort.

Read Here.

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Dispelling the Myth a Higher Minimum Wage Equals Job Loss, Microchips in Your Body, and Other Tidbits of Info for the Day

Minimum Wage Myth

Pulitzer Prize-winning economist David Cay Johnston penned an op-ed crushing the myth that raising the minimum wage would equal a loss in jobs.  There is no proof of this and he does a phenomenal job laying out the realities.  Nicely summarized here:

The idea that a higher minimum wage would destroy jobs is powerfully simple and intuitively appealing. The problem is that it is contradicted both by economic theory and the facts…Apart from the abundant evidence and economic theory, there are powerful business interests deploying PR strategies to confuse the public. (Emphasis added)6221571650_2ff1e8413c

Paul on Immigration

Rand Paul voiced his fear that Texas may be on its way to becoming a blue state in the near future because of the growing Hispanic population and stated the Republican party should consider a more open position on amnesty for immigrants.  This shows that even the hardest right-wingers are beginning to realize they are going to have to pull themselves to the left to save their own necks come election time.

Then Paul quoted his fellow Senator Mike Lee by stating, “We were all immigrants once.”  To which every Native American replied, “What?!”

Voting Rights for Former Prisoners

Attorney General Eric Holder expressed his support for changing voting laws so people who have served their time and reformed themselves can rightfully participate in elections again.  This is simply yet another aspect of the American justice system disproportionately affecting African-Americans and is long overdue for change.  And with the increasingly fast change we are seeing regarding marijuana legalization, these changes should quickly follow.

Microchips in Your What?!

A fascinating op-ed appeared on the BBC describing some of the advancements and possibilities of microchips being implanted in the human body.  An interesting read to see where the technology is going:

Amal Graafstra…is a double implantee – he has a microchip in each hand.

In his right hand is a re-writable chip, the same kind used in Oyster travel cards, which can be used to store small amounts of data. By pressing his hand to his phone, information can be downloaded from his body or uploaded into it. The left contains a simple identity number that can be scanned to unlock his front door, log into his computer or even start a motorbike

The Wealthy are Actually the Job Destroyers

Reuters reported that Barclays will be cutting 12,000 jobs and has already begun the process because the company is struggling so badly…so badly they are increasing bonuses for their top earners even though they stunk it up last year. 

It said it paid 2.4 billion pounds ($3.9 billion) in incentive awards last year, raising bonuses at the investment bank by 13 percent despite a slump in its profits. (Emphasis added)

So, with the logic that the wealthy are the “job creators” and they need more money to create the jobs (mythological idea, by the way), we can only assume Barclays will be hiring, let’s say, 24,000 in the near future because the top earners are so much better off.  Can’t wait for that to pan out for the people who they are about to lay off and prove all the right wingers correct on that myth.  Maybe it will happen guys.  And maybe pigs will be cruising through the air on their newly grown wings to celebrate.

Dying Conservative Myth: Raising the Minimum Wage Leads to Job Loss

While watching this debate on raising the minimum wage in the U.S., one commentator made a point that deserves further recognition on this issue.  When asked why economists are so split on the issue of job losses and the minimum wage, Jack Temple, a policy analyst at the National Employment Law Project, points out more and more evidence in research is showing there is a positive effect on the economy when the minimum wage is increased and more economists are beginning to realize this.  The more research is done, the more minds are changed to the truth.

Not a living wage. Not even close.

The problem, however, is the level of paradigmatic belief among economists when little evidence and research existed in this area was so heavily to the contrary.  The hurdle in making this change is getting people to abandon belief in the face of new facts that disprove long held notions originally based on seemingly common sense assumptions.

Why people believed in the myth is easy to see.  We assume employers are spending everything they must on wages and have no more profits to spare on this area of the balance sheet.  If they are forced by law to spend more on wages, job losses occur.

And therein lies what we are now learning is the faulty assumption: employers have plenty of profit left over for higher wages, they just choose to inflate the salaries of the minority at the top instead of the majority at the bottom.

And this is leading to more and more economists dropping the belief of the past and accepting the truths of the present.  Take a look at the evolution of economists being polled on this issue from its own subhead on Wikipedia’s minimum wage section:

According to a 1978 article in the American Economic Review, 90 percent of the economists surveyed agreed that the minimum wage increases unemployment among low-skilled workers.[81]

A 1992 survey by published in the same journal revealed 79% of economists in agreement that a minimum wage increases unemployment among young and unskilled workers.[82]

In 2013, a diverse group of economics experts was surveyed on their view of the minimum wage’s impact on employment. Thirty-four percent of respondents agreed with the statement, “Raising the federal minimum wage to $9 per hour would make it noticeably harder for low-skilled workers to find employment.”

Yes, there is money there to cover raising the minimum wage.

From 90% to 34% and clearly continuing to fall.  Probably took a while for people to believe the earth orbited the sun and wasn’t actually flat but new scientific facts eventually won the day over faulty beliefs.

The information on minimum wage and job loss is expanding as are corporate profits.  This combination is leading to more anger at the incredibly low level the minimum wage has fallen to over time relative to inflation (as shown above).  As people see Wall Street continue to hit record highs and show no ongoing ill effects from the Great Recession, they will question more and more why this stock boom isn’t “trickling down” in the form of higher wages and lower unemployment?

And the reason this anger is growing is because the science and facts are changing.  The truth is the world is not flat, the sun does not orbit the earth, and raising the minimum wage is not a job killer.  And for those that continue to believe the contrary, as the old saying goes, I have a lovely bridge in a wonderful location I think you might be interested in buying.

Raising the Minimum Wage: An Issue of Morality

McDonald's workersGood piece in The Guardian by Heidi Moore about how a raise in the minimum wage is both an economic and moral issue.

Read Here.

Raising The Minimum Wage: Job Killer or Fair Pay?

SOTU_bugA good piece in The Atlantic on whether if the minimum wage was increased to $9.00 an hour, as Pres. Obama has proposed, will it kill jobs or provide some relief to the those on the lowest rung of the latter? They pose this question to 5 respected professors and they each comeback with interesting findings.

Read Here.