Links to “The Battle of Algiers”

If you have not seen Pontecorvo’s 1966 masterpiece, The Battle of Algiers, I both admonish you and, yet, envy you.

I admonish you in that you have not done enough research into revolutionary art to have found this film. Yet, I envy you because you have yet to get that first breath of excitement when viewing the film the first time you only have once.

TBA is an intentionally grainy, black and white film shot in documentary style with a revolutionary heart. It is directed by Gillo Pontecorvo dramatizing the Algerian urban guerilla fighters during the fight for independence against the French colonialists. It concerns the guerilla tactics used by the NLF (FLN) and French paratroopers sent to quash the violent uprising which lasted for those three years.

Independence would finally be won by the Algerians in 1962, but this film centers around three years of bombings, assassinations, and torture allowing the French forces to end the most violent phase of the fighting.

Below are two links you can use to view the film. Watch Now!:

https://youtu.be/f_N2wyq7fCE

https://www.kanopy.com/product/battle-algiers-0

Egypt Now Fertile Ground For Extremists?

egypthirshbannerA good article by Michael Hirsch in The Atlantic proposing that Egypt may become the new, fertile recruiting ground for Islamic extremists and how the lack of a clear American foreign policy stance on recent events is just increasing the odds of this happening.

Read Here.

Egypt 2013 or France 1848 from Marx

11EGYPT-articleInlineI wrote a post a while back about the need for the experts and press to not to sound a death knell regarding the democratic revolution in Egypt just because of the difficulties having occurred their. But the “difficulties” are getting quite serious, I now observe.

So related here is a great article in the NYT by Sheri Berman, a political science professor at Barnard College, who applies Marx’s analysis of the 1848 French uprising to the current uprising in Egypt, and hopefully Egypt will not hold such a bloody experiment in politics as the Europeans did in the 19th century.

Read Here.

Two Upcoming Protests Sunday May Clash in Egypt

Opponents of Egypt's Islamist President Mohammed Morsi protestAn article in The Guardian relates that both Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood President Morsi’s supporters and liberal anti-Morsi protesters may clash in huge protests tomorrow in Alexandria. On Friday, two protester’s were killed (one an American) and 70 were injured with large numbers on both sides being reported that even larger protests will be held on Sunday.

The anti-Morsi protesters are critical of the Muslim Brotherhood’s religious fundamentalism. They say that Morsi himself is becoming too authoritarian and has exerted too much control over the nation’s media institutions. But on the other side, Morsi supporters say that the president was democratically elected and the Brotherhood’s religious bent is good for Egypt.

But what I’m concerned with is that the media is blowing these events out of proportion. They need to be reported on but I do not like the rhetoric I am hearing stating that change in Egypt is over and the hope for democracy is waning. What we need to remember, though, is that democracy needs time to develop. There needs to be time for the building of institutions, for the holding of fair elections, and a strong government not held hostage by political uprisings in Tahrir Square and the streets of Alexandria.

Democracy is not dead in Egypt, in my opinion, for there are a lot of similarities between the events in Egypt and those that occurred in France between 1789 and 1898. There was Napoleon, Louis Bonaparte, the manning of the barricades, and the Paris Commune. These anti-democratic actions in France all took place until a true democracy was created over a 100 years later. The creation of a democracy does not usually run as smoothly as the one that was created here in the United States.

Read Here.

Special Report: Witnesses tell of organized killings of Myanmar Muslims | Reuters

Special Report: Witnesses tell of organized killings of Myanmar Muslims | Reuters.

Horrific story of religious violence taking place in Myanmar.  It is awful that people who were bonded while trying to win rights under a dictatorship become enemies so quickly after winning some of their freedom because of the impact and social power of extremist religious leaders.  In this case, Buddhists are oppressing and killing Muslims with no true justification as we see another case where extremist religious followers breed more and more hatred and violence instead of the peace they claim to be a proponent of.