Former NSA Chief Keith Alexander Quickly Becoming the Villain

Certain people, who had their egos (not national security) terribly hurt by the Edward Snowden revelations, continue to call Snowden names and stuff and show their outrage toward him for exposing the NSA’s wrongdoing.  It would seem, however, they might want to redirect their outrage toward another former employee of the NSA: ex-chief Keith Alexander.

It was revealed yesterday the NSA is now being sued by a reporter for not disclosing Alexander’s financial records in the interest of making sure there were no conflicts of interest occurring while all of the other civil rights violations were being carried out under his direction.  And it has been noted by the Atlantic that this information, by law, should be made public unless it is stopped by the president because it could be damaging to national security, a claim that would be completely absurd.

Just a million $ per month…

And this isn’t the only question (or even the most important one) about money surrounding Alexander.  He is now offering his consulting services on security for the tiny sum of $1,000,000…per month.  Looking at this situation and considering his expertise, it is hard not to see the obvious: he is offering his knowledge of classified government information and tactics for money.  This is illegal, as Representative Alan Grayson has pointed out:

Disclosing or misusing classified information for profit is, as Mr. Alexander well knows, a felony. I question how Mr. Alexander can provide any of the services he is offering unless he discloses or misuses classified information, including extremely sensitive sources and methods. Without the classified information that he acquired in his former position, he literally would have nothing to offer to you. (Emphasis added)

In other words, when Alexander isn’t busy getting annihilated in interviews by comedians or admitting he lied to Congress, he is asking for a ton of money to shield companies from the snooping of the agency he former headed.

And this is happening in comparison to the wrongful demonizing of Snowden, who did not sell his secrets to anyone and did his whistle blowing in a manner that was very controlled so as not to put any lives in danger or damage national security.  Unless, of course, someone can actually provide an iota of evidence to the contrary, which hasn’t happened even a year later.

This brings us to a very fair question: who is the real villain now, Alexander or Snowden?  The answer gets more and more obvious as time goes on.

Kerry Calls Snowden A “Traitor”…Among Other Things

Edward Snowden Meets With German Green Party MP Hans-Christian Stroebele In MoscowThis morning when I was watching the Daily Rundown with Chuck Todd on MSNBC (a good program for mainstream politics), Todd interviewed Sec. of State John Kerry with questions about NSA-leaker Edward Snowden.

Kerry proceeded to call Snowden a “traitor” and said he “betrayed his country.” He then called on Snowden to “man up” and return to the United States to face the law. He said he should take his argument to the courts like Daniel Ellsberg did with the Pentagon Papers in the early 70’s, that is, if he were a “patriot.”

But what chance does he stand in the United States when pleading his case in a court of law?

According to this Guardian interview with Snowden adviser Ben Wizner, the chance of him returning to the United States to “man up” seems unlikely for the political landscape here would land him in an unfairly constructed trial with a draconian sentence if convicted.

But when I saw the interview this morning I thought of what of us who think that what Snowden did was a good thing? Am I and others sharing my opinion not patriots? I wouldn’t put the label of “hero” upon him in my own estimation, but I think he did the right thing and he should not, like Ellsberg, and unlike Manning, be convicted under the charges included in the outdated 1917 Espionage Act.

Also, remember that:

“NBC Nightly News” anchor and managing editor Brian Williams traveled to Moscow this week for an exclusive, wide-ranging interview with Edward Snowden. The former NSA contractor’s first-ever American television interview will air in an hour-long NBC News primetime special on Wednesday, May 28 at 10 p.m. Eastern/9 p.m. Central.

Watch it or DVR it!
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NSA Surveillance On “Frontline”

indexI just spent the last three hours watching two great episodes of the PBS program “Frontline” that deal with the history of the NSA surveillance program.

The first episode is a two-hour piece on the creation and development of the program from the time of 9/11/2001,  to the inclusion that NSA actions still continue with Pres. Obama.  It includes interviews with everyone (sans Bush/Cheney) and gives a detailed account of the history of the program.

The second episode of one hour contains a brief introduction to Edward Snowden and then the complicity by major tech corporations with the NSA and the FBI regarding electronic surveillance.

Plus the website has many complimentary information and interviews that I have yet to look into but look interesting. It is important and compelling viewing.

See Here.

Countering the Right: Ex-CIA Official’s Bungled Attempt at Discrediting Edward Snowden

One thing that continues to hold true for the intelligence community in regards to the Edward Snowden revelations: they will never stop trying to demonize him for hurting their image so badly.

In a recent op-ed, former high-ranking CIA official, Jack Devine, embarrassed himself by attacking Snowden and trying to bundle his whistle-blowing in with past traitors to the U.S. in an attempt to link his actions to more nefarious events.  He failed miserably.

The first glaring mistake Devine makes is giving the piece an overriding theme of comparing Snowden’s actions to that of traitors who fed covert information directly to Russia, mostly during the Cold War.  Just one colossal problem with that comparison: Snowden did not covertly give the information he had to another foreign government or entity.  He gave it to the media and to the people of the United States so what was going on could be debated openly.  That is not an act of treason and should not be compared to other traitorous actions.

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Internationally recognized by all as a hero…eventually.

Devine also alleges the revelations have helped terrorists devise ways to encrypt their communications and gives a nifty little chart supposedly showing what has happened since the publication of the Snowden documents.  This is the only item he can present as proof the situation has done “enormous international damage done to our country’s self-defense”.  But this assumes terrorist networks were not already encrypting their communications, which they obviously were.  The only thing his chart proves is a potential correlation and not actual causation.  If he wanted to prove Snowden’s revelations had caused harm, he would need to extend that chart out for years prior to show there had been no attempts by terrorists to find different ways to encrypt their data.

And he knows he can’t do it.

This just screams of previous claims that widespread torture of terrorists produced a ton of intelligence and many other terrorists were captured and terrorists attacks were stopped because of it.  Then when asked to provide actual proof of these frequent occurrences, the intelligence community comes up empty-handed.

Then he makes a rather bizarre point:

It is eminently clear that the intelligence community, Congress and the White House are struggling with the double-edged sword of privacy and national security, particularly as technology progresses at unprecedented speed. And I am reasonably optimistic that, despite the public hand-wringing, they will quickly come up with the right balance that protects our civil liberties and doesn’t cripple our intelligence collection against our enemies, who do, at times, operate in and cooperate with U.S. citizens. When the news cameras stop rolling, these officials all know just how vital these collection platforms are to our defense while at the same time truly appreciating the value of the law and the importance of protection of our citizens’ rights.

What he clearly doesn’t realize is (assuming this were a real democracy) this is what should have been done in the first place.  And while it seems there will be some improvements, there will likely be continued violations of privacy of U.S. citizens without their knowledge it is occurring.  This is obviously a claim made by someone trying to simply protect his agency’s turf and continue to get things done away from the critical eye of the American public.  And it completely ignores all of the wasteful spying on our allies and their leaders and the taxpayer dollars that were thrown down the drain on those endeavors.

Then Devine makes another odd claim, especially considering he spent over three decades at the CIA:

It is inconceivable that any country can last long without guarding its sensitive information and capabilities and washing people like Snowden out of the system.

So, a country can’t exist long if its info is out in the open?  Isn’t that the entire point of spying by U.S. intelligence?  By that logic, shouldn’t Germany and Brazil be crumbling right now because of U.S. spying on their leaders, Merkel and Rousseff?  Shouldn’t the U.S. be a footnote in the pages of history because of the Pentagon papers or the Chelsea Manning/Wikileaks situations?  This is just another ridiculous claim that has no bearing on reality whatsoever.

For years there were rigid policies set in place that rightly prohibited NSA, CIA, and FBI from collecting on American “persons” (including green-card holders), unless there was a court order demonstrating reasonable cause.

Yeah, that’s been one of the things clearly proven false by the Snowden revelations, something Devine grudgingly concedes with kid gloves in the following paragraph.

Finally, after all this absurdity, Devine makes the most ignorant and ridiculous claim of the entire piece.  He says Snowden should:

put himself in the hands of the U.S. judicial system, the most impartial in the world.

Wow.  I’ll assume that was done tongue-in-cheek.  Wait, no I won’t.

Most impartial?  Seriously?  I have to wonder which cave Mr. Devine has been living in for such a long time?

Let me introduce you to Robert H. Richards IV, a man convicted (not alleged or suspected but actually found guilty) of raping his daughter…who was three years old at the time.  Length of prison sentence handed down: zero days.  Why?  Because the “defendant will not fare well” in prison.  Did I mention he is an heir to the du Pont family fortune?

We could go on forever with the obvious disparities between how the justice system treats the rich vs. the poor.  But when someone makes such a stupid claim, it should always be addressed with the appropriate scolding.

The demonizing of Edward Snowden will continue in the days to come but one important aspect will be absent from these attacks: an iota of proof he did anything morally (or democratically) wrong or did damage to anything other than the intelligence community’s over-sized ego.

Obama Announces NSA Bulk Data-Collection Reform

Barack ObamaAn article in The Guardian, who first published whistle blower Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA bulk-information collection, reports on Pres. Obama’s announced reforms on data-collection policy.

Read Here.

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Gay Rights Progress and More Stunning NSA Tidbits for the Day

Gay Marriage in Texas

A judge in Texas has ruled the state’s ban on gay marriage unconstitutional while leaving the law in place upon further appeals.  Part of his ruling should be hammered home across the nation in the fight for gay rights:

“Without a rational relation to a legitimate governmental purpose, state-imposed inequality can find no refuge in our United States Constitution,” (Judge Orlando) Garcia wrote. “These Texas laws deny plaintiffs access to the institution of marriage and its numerous rights, privileges and responsibilities for the sole reason that Plaintiffs wish to be married to a person of the same sex.” (Emphasis added)

Gay Adoption in Michigan

Another court case concerning gay rights is currently underway in Michigan and is focusing on the effects of same-sex couples on parenting.  People are allowed their opinions as to what they may think about gay parents but let’s get one thing clear: there is no legitimate scientific research supporting the idea gay parenting is in any way a detriment to children.  As stated in the article:

“The scholarly consensus is that children raised by same-sex couples are in no disadvantage,” said Michael J. Rosenfeld, a Stanford University sociologist…“The consensus (among sociologists) is a consensus opinion that this debate is settled.

The NSA Will Attack You Personally and Attempt Brainwashing

There appears to be no end as to how shocking and despicable the NSA actions and programs can be.  Glen Greenwald, through Edward Snowden’s whistle-blowing, is now showing us the proof the NSA was/is using covert operations on the Internet to go after political activists and discredit them in any way possible.

Are they texting my Momma?!

As bad as all of these actions are, take a close look at the last bullet point on the slide.  One has to wonder what guidelines were followed and what alleged crime had to be committed for the texts and emails to be sent out to friends and family.  And remember, these actions would have been taken against people who allegedly had done something bad, not criminals convicted in a court of law.

Another slide included in Greenwald’s article is just as astonishing and suggests making attempts at brainwashing people.  In a slide titled “Gambits for Deception”, we see Orwellian phrases such as “Present story fragments”, “Swap the real for the false”, “Repetition reduces vigilance”, “Repetition creates expectancies”, and “Channel behavior”.  How exactly is “swapping the real for the false” construed as being an important part of a democracy?

And let’s not forget there has been no proof any of the NSA’s unwarranted domestic spying activities have produced anything resembling useful actions that have stopped a terrorist, which is the justification for these programs.

Obama May Roll Back NSA Programs

6c848f12-42cd-4a0c-9340-a4425f2fb76a-460x276Yesterday Pres. Obama conducted a press conference from the White House that included indicators that he may rollback some NSA programs that violate privacy domestic and abroad. He also made some interesting comments on the future for Edward Snowden, too.

Read Here.

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Snowden: NSA Documents for Brazilian Asylum

snowden-340An article in The Post reports that the NSA document-leaker Edward Snowden has offered the Brazilian government access to his collection of secret documents in return for asylum.

Brazil has been the most vocal critic of NSA collection of their electronic communications for the most part.

But this, in my opinion, is beginning to smack of espionage by Snowden when he is just offering his collected materials to various other governments for asylum. His idealism is turning into pragmatism.

What’s your opinion?

Read Here.

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Two Questions About the NSA Spying on EU

As more info is released surrounding NSA’s spying tactics, more questions arise as to why they are doing what they have been doing.  We now know “US agencies bugged European embassies and parliament buildings” and it is no surprise the governments in Europe are pretty angry about this.  And concerning this revelation, two relevant question come to mind:

  • What is the need for this data and is it just drowning out important data that would actually matter to national security?

    When will this change?

I asked this question in a previous post but it becomes more and more important to ask it as we find out new info.  It just seems like the NSA produced a mountain of data and stored it with much of it being very unnecessary and possibly getting in the way of doing their job of protecting us from real threats.

The reasons for this bugging should be explained thoroughly to both the American people and our allies.  If there was a legitimate reason for tapping the offices because of some past revelation that Germany was housing a known terrorist in their embassy, then tell us.  Show us why we have to spend the resources on conducting this kind of business in the interests of national security and, just as importantly, why we can’t look at cutting defense spending on clearly unnecessary actions like these when the budget needs it.

  • What damage to national security has the NSA revelations truly done to this point?

So, we are tapping the EU embassies and offices.  Why is this being revealed to the world a danger to United States’ security?

Up to this point there seems to be little to be scared about over the NSA leaks by whistleblower Edward Snowden.  The government is using its scare tactics to convince us this has been a grave threat to our lives but one must question whether that has been even remotely true, particularly considering revelations such as these.  If anything, it has simply informed the people about the ridiculous nature of part of the military industrial complex and the obvious waste of taxpayer money conducted in our names.

Until the government’s security apparatus can produce some type of evidence showing where real damage has been done over these leaks, we must question if they are just angry about the massive black eye Snowden has given the U.S. government and the overreach of its spying actions.  The simple truth seems to be the public is more informed about government waste and the power structure that is supported by that waste sees the threat of potentially losing its funding.