Leftist Revolution: How to Run The Initial Days

In my previous post, I expressed the opinion that a major mistake made by Communist nations, both past and present, is that they moved too fast to make radical economic changes after their respective revolutions. Stalin’s “Five Year Plans”, Mao’s “Great Leap Forward”, and the very radical economic and societal moves made by Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge left tens of millions dead. What I propose instead is that once a revolution is won here in the U.S., and a vanguard/transition party is established, we then move slowly into a socialist system.

Now, we can make major societal changes regarding human rights issues like LGBTQ issues, women’s equality and abortion rights, and of course, minority rights. And we should also start socializing major industries, like utility companies, the medical system, and other day-to-day human rights issues. But the last thing we want to do is something as radical as eliminating the money-based system or forcing people into collectives.

The reason for this is because the people are not yet informed about the nature of the Socialist/Communist system as of today. We need to create a new hegemonic culture based on equality and the new government-to-citizen relationship first. Italian scholar and Communist Antonio Gramsci iwrote about how capitalism is the hegemonic culture. So everything we know is based on that brutal system and, therefore, it is hard to think outside of it, especially in America where the entire history of our young nation is nothing but capitalism. We don’t have the history of a feudal system. Other nations do. So they have something to fall back on, culturally. So that’s why we need a vanguard/transitional party so immensely.

In conclusion, we must make a gradual change in our economic system. This will help the masses ease into a new leftist system. I arrived at this notion because, according to scholars, it took France’s democratic system to work itself out all the way from the storming of the Bastille in 1789, until 1898. So we must be patient and live with a gradual economic change. Plus, Ionce comfortable with the socialist system, the masses can then move into a Communist system for they will be educated in terms of the next steps towards emancipation.

So we cannot have a radical economic change in the U.S. after a far left revolution. The people need to be eased into a new system. Then we will be ready for a Communist system in the a post-socialist stage… even if it takes 100 years.

The New POV of Sparking The Left!

Over the past few months, I have been publishing a podcast on working class issues. Yet I returned to Sparking The Left because the number of listens were very low. But in some episodes I began with editorials trying to convey the radical-leftist approach. So I’ll be posting a few of the essays here, in easy to understand language, to outline STL’s far-left point of view:

As I have stated above, this blog now comes from a radical leftist point of view. And I know what people think of when hearing of far-left governments:

  •             Stalin
  •             Gulags
  •             Purges
  •             Mass starvation

But those are results of authoritarianism rather than a radical-leftist government (another post for another time).

A true form of socialism, much less communism, has yet to be practiced in history. And what a true form of a radical leftist system is about is putting power in the hands of the workers. Workers should own the companies they work for because they are the ones who are engaged in the labor.

Right now major stock holders on Wall Street own and control the factories and corporations. But they do nothing but sit and collect the profits while we get the crumbs. They don’t unload trucks, sort freight, work a cash register, fill orders, or what-have-you, for often more tha

n 40 hours a week. The fruits of our labor have been usurped from the rightful owners; and that is us, the working class.

Now, I hear you saying, “How can a corrupt system like ours ever turn over all of the power to the workers?”

The answer is we smash the current capitalist oligarchy; or our so-called democratic system.

It must go.

Now which form of a far-left government we construct is up for debate. And in all honesty, I’m not sure which one it should actually be. But what I do believe right now is socialism is the best form of government we have available to us at this time.

So, in general, we must leave behind the Gulags, purges, and mass starvation, and enact a socialist government. Though it sounds extreme to complete this feat, but our current so-called democratic system must be smashed.

Any ideas or thoughts would be greatly appreciated.

In Solidarity,

Interview with Noam Chomsky

Noam-Chomsky-Copyright-Don-There is a good interview at Alternet with Noam Chomsky which is almost a must-read. Noam Chomsky, Professor Emeritus at MIT and a political thinker who the NYT called “the most important intellectual in America,” is probably the most influential political influence in my own personal development as a politico. I cannot recommend his books enough. In this interview he goes over his own anarcho-syndicalist beliefs, his own theoretical model of “manufacturing consent,” and his advice for college students among other things. If you are smart at all you will read this interview and, immediately afterward, go buy at least 5 of Dr. Chomsky’s books.

Read Here.

“Cultural Hegemony” in America

I just recently read The Antonio Gramsci Reader and found his political/sociological concept of “cultural hegemony” very important to the leftist movement.

Gramsci was an Italian Marxist theorist and cofounder of the Italian Communist Party who was imprisoned by Mussolini ‘s fascist regime. While in prison, he worked on the concept of “hegemony” present in a society’s culture and how it maintains the capitalist state.

Cultural hegemony is when one group of people (the capitalists in Gramsci’s analysis) does not only control the economic system but also defines those things that make up the society’s culture, i.e., norms, values, mores, general worldview. Now this “hegemony” is so strong that it is perceived by the other groups in society (the proletariat, in Gramsci’s view) as “natural;” as an inescapable truth, or just the way things are. Gramsci contends that this hegemony also leads to the other groups in society (the proletariat) to perceive the interests of the hegemonic group as their own.

In the United States today the capitalists are the hegemonic group just as they were in 1920’s Italy. The 1%ers control our means of production and define our culture for they are on top of the socio-economic ladder. This makes thinking outside of capitalism, and the interests of the very rich, difficult for the American people.

This is especially so because America, in its young history, has always been a capitalist country. We’ve been raised on Benjamin Franklin and Horatio Alger. We did not have the benefit of rising up from the feudal system like the countries of Europe did. The European societies have at least a historical touchstone that they can lend from that says that an economic/political /cultural system is not natural law. But America does not have that historical narrative to draw from

This problem in America even manifests itself when the hegemony of the capitalists is so strong that those on the right side of the political spectrum often vote against their own interests, e.g., poor, rural states traditionally vote for the GOP. They are often irrational actors.

So what to do?

We must educate, that is what we must do. The media (which is owned and controlled by the 1%ers and is fed to us by visible gatekeepers who do not even know that they are puppets), the schools, the general government, etc., must be refuted by the Left. We must get this kind of analysis to the masses and offer a clear alternative to the hegemonic culture of capitalism.